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How do I contact my mail server?

I’m seeking to do something rather simple, but don’t know where to
start looking for the answer. I want to contact my email server, send
my password and username, then check how many pieces of email are
waiting to be downloaded. Can Webkit do this? Where do I start? Thanks.

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posted by admin in Uncategorized and have Comments (4)

4 Responses to “How do I contact my mail server?”

  1. admin says:

    Ed Sutherland <digi…@twcny.rr.com> wrote:
    > I’m seeking to do something rather simple, but don’t know where to
    > start looking for the answer. I want to contact my email server, send
    > my password and username, then check how many pieces of email are
    > waiting to be downloaded. Can Webkit do this? Where do I start? Thanks.

    If it were me I would just use POP directly to find this out. Talking
    POP to your email server is very easy; it’s a simple protocol. If you
    don’t understand how it works, read the RFC; also, turn on tcpdump or
    Interarchy or similar tool and use your normal email client so you can
    eavesdrop on how the normal conversation goes. m.


    matt neuburg, phd = m…@tidbits.com, http://www.tidbits.com/matt/
    AppleScript: The Definitive Guide
    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0596005571/somethingsbymatt
    Read TidBITS! It’s free and smart. http://www.tidbits.com

  2. admin says:

    In article <201220030824192559%digi…@twcny.rr.com>, Ed Sutherland

    <digi…@twcny.rr.com> wrote:
    > I’m seeking to do something rather simple, but don’t know where to
    > start looking for the answer. I want to contact my email server, send
    > my password and username, then check how many pieces of email are
    > waiting to be downloaded. Can Webkit do this? Where do I start? Thanks.

    If literally all you are going to do is the above and you aren’t ever
    going to send and receive mail, then using POP directly might be the
    easiest answer but there also existing frameworks and tools out there
    as well if  you want to go further.

    You don’t say what environment you are working in but if you are
    working in Cocoa, you might want to take a look at the Pantomime
    framework which will allow you to do anything with the mail servers you
    might want to do and you don’t have to get down to the POP and SMTP
    protocols.  The problem with Pantomime is the lack of documentation but
    after some digging around and particularly by looking at the source
    code for GnuMail to see how they used Pantomime, I’ve found it pretty
    easy to use.

    Spence

  3. admin says:

    In article <201220030940593921%jspence…@charter.net>, James Spencer

    <jspence…@charter.net> wrote:

    Where can I find the source (I have the binary) of GnuMail and
    Pantomime?

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    > You don’t say what environment you are working in but if you are
    > working in Cocoa, you might want to take a look at the Pantomime
    > framework which will allow you to do anything with the mail servers you
    > might want to do and you don’t have to get down to the POP and SMTP
    > protocols.  The problem with Pantomime is the lack of documentation but
    > after some digging around and particularly by looking at the source
    > code for GnuMail to see how they used Pantomime, I’ve found it pretty
    > easy to use.

    > Spence

  4. admin says:

    Ed Sutherland <digi…@twcny.rr.com> wrote:
    > In article <201220030940593921%jspence…@charter.net>, James Spencer
    > <jspence…@charter.net> wrote:

    > Where can I find the source (I have the binary) of GnuMail and
    > Pantomime?

    <http://www.collaboration-world.com/cgi-bin/projects.cgi&gt;

    HTH.